The Vox Box

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Sep 1

If cats looked like frogs we’d realize what nasty, cruel little bastards they are. Style. That’s what people remember.

- Terry Pratchett “Lords and Ladies” (via lesetagebuch)

Sep 1
r3peating-apologies:

lenofi:

this is where i’d keep my scratching post…IF I HAD ONE

THE COMMENT IS PERFECT AND I CAN’T STOP LAUGHING OHMYGOD.

r3peating-apologies:

lenofi:

this is where i’d keep my scratching post…IF I HAD ONE

THE COMMENT IS PERFECT AND I CAN’T STOP LAUGHING OHMYGOD.

(Source: alxbngala)

Sep 1
dduane:

lettersfromtitan:

counteragentfilms:

jackslenderman:

WaterBOB 100gal bathtub water jug.
In an emergency with water shortages people are told to fill their bathtubs to have water on hand. but most bathtubs are not clean in an emergency, and the water will evaporate when left open to the air over time.
WaterBOB solves those problems! Holds 100gal of water, fits any bathtub, and has a hand pump to pump out water as you need without wasting any. Keeps the water clean and fresh, FDA approved material and BPA free. Costs less than 20$ and available on amazon.

Bought two when was in my doomsday prepper phase

This is brilliant.

What a smart idea!

dduane:

lettersfromtitan:

counteragentfilms:

jackslenderman:

WaterBOB 100gal bathtub water jug.


In an emergency with water shortages people are told to fill their bathtubs to have water on hand. but most bathtubs are not clean in an emergency, and the water will evaporate when left open to the air over time.

WaterBOB solves those problems! Holds 100gal of water, fits any bathtub, and has a hand pump to pump out water as you need without wasting any. Keeps the water clean and fresh, FDA approved material and BPA free. Costs less than 20$ and available on amazon.

Bought two when was in my doomsday prepper phase

This is brilliant.

What a smart idea!

vmagazine:

'Seeking Aether' (experimental garment collection): InAisce FW 13/14 Men's Collection featuring South Sudanese refugee and former child soldier turned actor, model and activist Ger Duany  - video link

Breathtaking views show the stars, Milky Way, airglow, and light pollution over New Zealand skies.

"Here are images I captured during last months from New Zealand. Great country to catch colors of airglow almost everywhere…" - Petr Horálek

(Source: afro-dominicano)

teamcosplaycouture:

Cosplay Couture interpretation of the 8th Doctor

Costume by Courtney Coulson

Photography by Luke Milton

Location: Taylor’s College Nedlands

It’s great to finally get back to our Doctor Who series and Eight is one I have been greatly anticipating as he is my absolute favourite Doctor. He may have only had one movie but I am in love with the Big Finish audio dramas. I was so glad that McGann got to continue in the role even if only in audio form.

As his run was the most unconventional, the evolution of his character and his costume bare the evidence of that. Eight is very romantic, easily the most refined and elegant of the Doctors.The original costume never really felt lived in, he was so buttoned up, and because we only see him wearing it in one film, he never got the opportunity to break it in and make it his own like the other Doctors.

But over the years he’s changed, starting out as an old soul with a child-like enthusiasm that gradually gave way to a darker side as he was traumatised by certain events, which culminated in him becoming the War Doctor. As such, my costume reflects elements of his journey, it’s not quite as stuffy as his original costume, there’s a bit of edge there.

Courtney Coulson

I’m not a massive Doctor Who fan, but I am very attached to this series of shoots as Courtney’s desire to do a fashion portrayal of each Doctor was a catalyst for many of the shoots you see on this site. After a year of working closely together it was fantastic to finally add another couple of Doctors to the collection - this one, plus one another who you will see next week. And the location couldn’t have been more perfect, we were incredibly lucky to discover that the location we’d picked had a very similar palette to the costume we were working with. Another in a long string of happy accidents.

Luke Milton

lovejustalittlebitharder:

friendly reminder that if i have ever befriended you and have not spoken to you in a while it’s nothing you’ve done wrong it’s just because i’m a piece of shit at keeping in contact with people and i still love you okay good

(Source: starlightshimmerseverywhere)

thecutestofthecute:

So I lost like 10 followers for posting pictures of rottweilers

okay

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then

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fine

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Puppy party without you guys

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LATER HATERS

I’m so excited to be here. Really, really excited. Okay, I’ll get to it. Hi. One of the first things people usually ask me is, “Gabourey, how are you so confident?” I hate that. I always wonder if that’s the first thing they ask Rihanna when they meet her. “RiRi! How are you so confident?” Nope. No. No. But me? They ask me with that same incredulous disbelief every single time. “You seem so confident! How is that?”

When I was ten years, in the fifth grade, my teacher, Miss Lowe had announced that my class would be having a holiday party right before the Christmas break. She asked if we all could all bring snacks or soda or juice to the class party. She also said we had the option of cooking something, if we like. I was so excited. I immediately decided that I would make gingerbread cookies, and that everyone would love them. I told my mom my plan, and I asked her for money to go buy the ingredients. She thought I should just buy store-bought cookies, but I told her, “Those cookies didn’t have enough love in them!” I had to make the cookies. So I bought the mix, and I bought cookie cutters in the shape of Christmas trees and bells, and I made a practice batch of cookies that went horribly wrong. Good thing they were a practice batch. They were awful. And then the night before the party, I made another batch of cookies. And they were also awful, but they looked a lot better. I carefully put the cookies in a Ziplock bag, so I could take them to school the next day. When I got to school that morning, I could not wait until that party. And I was so proud of those cookies, and all the effort I put into making them, I started to think that maybe I wouldn’t just be the first woman black President — maybe I would also be a celebrity chef! I mean, why limit myself?

The party was set to take place during the last hour of school, and I waited excitedly for it all day long. Finally, it was party time. My teacher asked what everyone brought, and I proudly announced that I had baked cookies for the class. I think I felt prouder knowing that everyone else just bought stuff. I was the only one who made anything, because clearly, I’m a little more clever than anyone else. So as the party starts up, I walk around the class, proudly offering cookies to everyone. No one took a cookie. No one. No one except Nicholas, who was the first person I offered one to. But after a few of our other classmates set him straight, he actually caught up with me as I walked around the class, and gave the cookie back. I walked around the class trying to hand out cookies to my class, until I ended up back at my desk with the same amount of cookies that I started with. I sat at my desk alone, eating those gross gingerbread cookies that took hours to make, all by myself. I put chocolate chips in them, that’s why they were gross. I wasn’t surprised. I just forgot for a moment that my entire class hated me. I had zero friends from the fourth grade to the sixth grade. Who the hell was I baking cookies for? I really got so excited to bake that I had forgotten that everyone hated my guts. Why didn’t they like me? I was fat, yes. I had darker skin and weird hair, yes. But the truth is, this isn’t a story about bulling, or color, or weight. They hated me because… I was an asshole!

Yep. I was a bossy, bossy asshole. See, remember when I said that I thought I was more clever than everyone else? Well, I did! And I told them that — every single day! Those kids couldn’t get a word in edgewise, without me cutting them off to remind them that I was smarter, funnier, and all around wittier than them. I was always sarcastic — I called it my birth defect. And let’s face it, kids don’t get sarcasm. They don’t appreciate it. They never knew what I was talking about. And when they would say, “Wait… huh?” I would say, “My God, Alicia, read a book!” I know. I spoke differently than them, I just did. I sounded more like a Valley Girl than a Brooklyn girl. My classmates always asked me if I was adopted by white people. I’d say, “No. Both my parents went to college.” I know that was rude, but I’m still really proud of that. To be fair, in my neighborhood, not everyone’s parents had the opportunity to go to college. Most of my classmates’ parents were teens when they had them. My parents had me at age 30. My father was born in Senegal. His father was the mayor of the capital city, Dakar, and my dad often took my brother and I back home with him to visit Africa, while most of my classmates had never stepped out of the Lower East Side. My mother was a teacher in high school, that’s why I went there, but my mom also had a voice, so when I was nine, she quit her teaching job to go sing in the subway. She actually made more money as a singer for tips than she made as a teacher! I know! And she was quickly becoming the underground version of Whitney Houston. She was the strongest, smartest, and most talented person I had ever known. Even today, I don’t want to grow up to be anyone as much as I want to grow up to be her. I know!

The point is, I was a snob. I thought I was better than the kids in my class, and I let them know it. That’s why they didn’t like me. I think the reason I thought so highly of myself all the time was because no one else ever did. I figured out I was smart because my mother would yell at my older brother. She’d say, “Your little sister is going to pass you in school. You’re going to get left behind and she’s going to graduate before you.” But she never said to me, “You are smart.” What she did say was, “You are too fat.” I got the message that I wasn’t pretty, and I probably wasn’t normal, but I was smart! Why wouldn’t they just say that? “You’re smart.” It’s actually not that hard. My dad would yell at my brother, “Gabourey does her homework by herself! Why can’t you?” But he never said to me, “Good job.” What he did say was, “You need to lose weight so I can be proud of you.” I know. So I got made fun of at school, I got made fun of at home too, my older brother hated me, my dad just didn’t understand me, and my mom, who had been a fat girl at my age herself, understood me perfectly … but she berated me because she was so afraid of what she knew was to come for me. So I never felt safe when I was at home. And my response was always to eat more, because nothing says, “You hurt my feelings. Fuck you!” like eating a delicious cookie. Cookies never hurt me.

“Gabourey, how are you so confident?” It’s not easy. It’s hard to get dressed up for award shows and red carpets when I know I will be made fun of because of my weight. There’s always a big chance if I wear purple, I will be compared to Barney. If I wear white, a frozen turkey. And if I wear red, that pitcher of Kool-Aid that says, “Oh, yeah!” Twitter will blow up with nasty comments about how the recent earthquake was caused by me running to a hot dog cart or something. And “Diet or Die?” [She gives the finger to that] This is what I deal with every time I put on a dress. This is what I deal with every time someone takes a picture of me. Sometimes when I’m being interviewed by a fashion reporter, I can see it in her eyes, “How is she getting away with this? Why is she so confident? How does she deal with that body? Oh my God, I’m going to catch fat!”

What I would say, is my mom moved my brother and I to my aunt’s house. Her name is Dorothy Pitman Hughes, she is a feminist, an activist, and a lifelong friend of Gloria Steinem. Every day, I had to get up and go to school where everyone made fun of me, and I had to go home to where everyone made fun of me. Every day was hard to get going, no matter which direction I went. And on my way out of the house, I found strength. In the morning on the way out to the world, I passed by a portrait of my aunt and Gloria together. Side by side they stood, one with long beautiful hair and one with the most beautiful, round, Afro hair I had ever seen, both with their fists held high in the air. Powerful. Confident. And every day as I would leave the house… I would give that photo a fist right back. And I’d march off into battle. [She starts crying] I didn’t know that I was being inspired then. On my way home, I’d walk back up those stairs, I’d give that photo the fist again, and continue my march back in for more battle. [She pulls a tissue from her cleavage and dabs her eyes] That’s what boobs are for! I didn’t know I was being inspired then, but I was. If they could feel like that, maybe I could! I just wanted to look that cool. But it made me feel that strong.

So, okay, we’re back in fifth grade, and I just had been rejected by 28 kids in a row. And I was sitting alone at my desk, with an empty Ziplock bag, crumbs in my lap, and I was at this great party that I had waited for all week. I waited all week for this party that I wasn’t invited to. And for some reason I got up, I sat on my desk, and I partied my ass off. I laughed loudly when something funny happened. And when Miss Lowe put on music, I was one of the first ones to get up and dance. I joined the limbo, and ate chips, and drank soda, and I enjoyed myself, even though no one wanted me there. You know why? I told you — I was an asshole! I wanted that party! And what I want trumps what 28 people want me to do, especially when what they want me to do is leave. I had a great time. I did. And if I somehow ruined my classmates’ good time, then that’s on them. “How are you so confident?” “I’m an asshole!” Okay? It’s my good time, and my good life, despite what you think of me. I live my life, because I dare. I dare to show up when everyone else might hide their faces and hide their bodies in shame. I show up because I’m an asshole, and I want to have a good time. And my mother and my father love me. They wanted the best life for me, and they didn’t know how to verbalize it. And I get it. I really do. They were better parents to me than they had themselves. I’m grateful to them, and to my fifth grade class, because if they hadn’t made me cry, I wouldn’t be able to cry on cue now. [Dabs tears] If I hadn’t been told I was garbage, I wouldn’t have learned how to show people I’m talented. And if everyone had always laughed at my jokes, I wouldn’t have figured out how to be so funny. If they hadn’t told me I was ugly, I never would have searched for my beauty. And if they hadn’t tried to break me down, I wouldn’t know that I’m unbreakable. [Dabs tears] So when you ask me how I’m so confident, I know what you’re really asking me: how could someone like me be confident? Go ask Rihanna, asshole!

- Gabourey Sidibe’s speech at the Gloria Awards and Gala hosted by the Ms. Foundation for Women, courtesy of Vulture.com (via meat13)

Today’s Cooking Experiment

So, it was pretty good, but had enough flaws to it that I think any future iterations will be heavily modified (or not pursued at all.) Behind a cut to save the uninterested!

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